The origin and evolution of dust in interstellar and circumstellar environments
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The origin and evolution of dust in interstellar and circumstellar environments status report, April 1993

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Published by Dept. of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Troy, NY, [Washington, DC .
Written in

Subjects:

  • Cosmic dust.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementprincipal investigator, Douglas C.B. Whittet, co-investigator, Chun M. Leung.
SeriesNASA contractor report -- NASA CR-193025.
ContributionsLeung, Chun Ming., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17680962M

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A circumstellar disc (or circumstellar disk) is a torus, pancake or ring-shaped accumulation of matter composed of gas, dust, planetesimals, asteroids, or collision fragments in orbit around a the youngest stars, they are the reservoirs of material out of which planets may form. Around mature stars, they indicate that planetesimal formation has taken place and around . Then, the book explores the origin and evolution of dust, tracing its life cycle in a succession of environments from circumstellar shells to diffuse interstellar clouds, molecular clouds, protostars, and protoplanetary disks. The final chapter summarizes progress toward a unified model. Origin and Evolution of Interplanetary Dust In Situ Determination of Interplanetary Out-of-the Ecliptic and Near-Solar Dust Environments. Pages The Source Composition of Galactic Cosmic Rays as Possibly Originated from the Dust in the Circumstellar and Interstellar Space. Since the evolution of the solid carbon materials (the carbon dust phase) was predicted in different environments such as the diffuse ISM, circumstellar media and .

  Science, this issue p. [][1] Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More Cited by: Interstellar dust is typically on average about microns in size, some can be as large as 50 microns and some as small as just a dozen or so atoms! This Author: Futurism. Formation and Evolution of Circumstellar and Interstellar PAHs: A Laboratory Study Article (PDF Available) in EAS Publications Series January with 53 . Lodders presented a paper on circumstellar chemistry and presolar grains at the rd American Chemical Society National Meeting, held March in Chicago, where a special symposium was held to track the evolution of the elements across space and time. A book of proceedings is being prepared for publication.

Primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles contain small quantities of dust grains with highly anomalous isotopic compositions. These grains formed in the winds of evolved stars and in the ejecta of stellar explosions, i.e., they represent a sample of circumstellar grains that can be analyzed with high precision in the laboratory. Such studies have provided a wealth of Cited by: 1.   Then, the book explores the origin and evolution of dust, tracing its life cycle in a succession of environments from circumstellar shells to diffuse interstellar clouds, molecular clouds, protostars, and protoplanetary disks. The final chapter summarizes progress toward a /5(3). Our knowledge of the origin, evolution, nature, and distribution of organic matter in space has undergone a revolution in recent years. Insights into various aspects of this material can be found using a variety of different technical approaches. These range from telescopic measurements by observational astronomers over a wide range of wavelengths, to laboratory experiments and . Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft Andrew J. Westphal et al. Science , (); DOI: /science This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. If you wish to distribute this article to others, you can order high-quality copies for yourFile Size: 1MB.