Coastal development and areas of environmental concern
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Coastal development and areas of environmental concern proceedings of a symposium held at East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C., March 5, 1975

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Published by North Carolina State University in Raleigh .
Written in

Subjects:

  • Coastal zone management -- North Carolina -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Grant 04-3-158-40.

Statementedited by Simon Baker.
SeriesSea grant publication ; UNC-SG-75-18, Sea Grant publication (Raleigh, N.C.) -- UNC-SG-75-18.
ContributionsBaker, Simon.
The Physical Object
Pagination90 p. :
Number of Pages90
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14130850M

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Get this from a library! Coastal development and areas of environmental concern: proceedings of a symposium held at East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, March 5, [Simon Baker; United States. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Office of Sea Grant.; North Carolina. Department of Administration.;]. to coastal areas. Popula-tion growth, land devel-opment, and resort de-velopment are all particularly intense along the coast. Coastal areas are experiencing high growth rates, and the beach is a popular destination for vacations, second homes, and retirement. Property on or near the shore is always in high demand and as a conse-quence usually expensive. number of recommendations are highlighted and hopefully, it can guide the concern parties in constructing related strategies that can assist the coastal community in lessening the impacts of the environmental changes. Keywords: Coastal Community, Environmental Management, Community Development Introduction. Coastal Environment. The coastal zone is an interface between the land and sea, which comprised of a continuum of coastal land, intertidal area, aquatic systems including the network of rivers and estuaries, islands, transitional and intertidal areas, salt marshes, wetlands, and .

Areas of Critical Environmental Concern or ACEC designations highlight areas where special management attention is needed to protect important historical, cultural, and scenic values, or fish and wildlife or other natural resources. ACECs can also be designated to protect human life and safety from natural hazards. ACECs can only be designated during the land-use planning. This book describes critical environmental issues that face coastal ocean and Great Lakes areas, including eutrophication, habitat modification, hydrologic and hydrodynamic disruption, exploitation of resources, toxic effects on ecosystems and humans, introduction of nonindigenous species, global climate change and variability, and shoreline erosion and hazardous storms. Tourism in coastal areas is one of the fastest growing types of the world tourism industry, but whether it destroys more than it protects will depend upon how it is put into practice. Tourism development in the coastal environment has interfaced with the attractiveness of the . The Great Barrier Reef catchment is used for agriculture, urban and industrial development, mining, port activities and island development. While these activities provide many economic and social benefits, coastal developments can have a negative impact on the Reef’s health.

Areas of Environmental Concern (AECs) are the foundation of the Coastal Resources Commission's permitting program for coastal development. An AEC is an area of natural importance: It may be easily destroyed by erosion or flooding; or it may have environmental, social, economic or aesthetic values that make it valuable to our : () Released on 5 December during the third UN Environment Assembly in Nairobi, Kenya, the report covers six key emerging issues: the environmental dimension of antimicrobial resistance; nanomaterials; Marine Protected Areas and sustainable development; sand and dust storms; off-grid solar solutions; and environmental displacement. Section 2: Areas of Environmental Concern Areas of Environmental Concern (AECs) are the foundation of the Coastal Resources Commission's permitting program for coastal development. An AEC is an area of natural importance: It may be easily destroyed by erosion or flooding; or it may have environmental, social, economic or aesthetic values that make it valuable to our state. In section (A), 'Integrated management and sustainable development of coastal and marine areas, including Exclusive Economic Zones'. coastal nations commit themselves to 'integrated management and sustainable development of coastal areas and the marine environment under their national jurisdiction" (par. ).Cited by: